Monday, September 15, 2014

Back It Up! Go The Distance With Your Devices

Be a winner when it comes to backing up your files, not a loser!


When was the last time you got knocked down because you didn't back up something you needed?

School is on, work is picking up, fall is here, and Christmas is around the corner. Are you backing up your photos, docs and data? You should be. Just as you schedule to rake the leaves, do your laundry and pencil in time for some football games, you need to be backing up what's on your digital devices often.



Your Corner (wo)Man:

I tend to get a frantic phone call, text or email about once a week from a friend, colleague or student. I can't find ______. What do I do!? So, I have compiled the top 5 questions I've been asked about backing up personal and work items. No clinching.

Here they are blow by blow:

1. I want to back up files as I share them with others without clogging my email and their email.

I have mentioned these before but here are my favorite apps/programs for file sharing:

  • For simple file sharing: 
    • Dropbox is simple, user friendly and very common. Find out more here
    • iCloud is the obvious choice as well for Apple devices.
    • Google Drive for all types of devices
  • For extensive backup (family/home and/or business):
    • Crashplan is one of the highest rated online backup services. It has it all. See for yourself here.


2. I can't load anymore apps or take pictures because I have no more storage, what should I do?

  • First, go to "Settings" then look up what is eating up all your storage
  • Once you get to "Settings", tap "General" then "Usage"
  • From there, give it a minute or two while it aggregates all your storage info and will list which apps are using the most storage. Typically it's videos and pics.
  • For pics and video back up: You can back them up easily to you computer (Mac or PC) by following these directions.
  • I use Dropbox (as mentioned above) for automatic upload/backup of all my pictures and videos, then I arrange them into folders to share with others or print.


3.  Ah!! My iPad is disabled from trying too many passwords, how can I get it enabled again?

If you have entered the passcode incorrectly more than 6 times your device will become diabled. Don't worry, it's actually pretty common in this day of a million passwords, passcodes and usernames to remember.  Here is a step by step process, with images to get you back up again.

but then...

Ok, but I haven't synced it with my laptop, now what? Please don't say I have to go to the Apple Store and wait.

You need to get to "recovery mode": (follow these steps to a T, and be patient it can take up to 10 minutes or so)
  • Disconnect the USB cable from the device, but leave the other end of the cable connected to your computer's USB port.
  • Turn off the device: Press and hold the Sleep/Wake button for a few seconds until the red slider appears, then slide the slider. Wait for the device to shut down.
  • While pressing and holding the Home button, reconnect the USB cable to the device. The device should turn on.
  • Continue holding the Home button until you see the Connect to iTunes screen.
  • iTunes will alert you that it has detected a device in recovery mode. Click OK, and then restore the device.

4. So, my phone jumped out of my pocket and into a pool, toilet, puddle of rain...um, what now?
Well, here's the long and short of it. Quick dos and don'ts

  • DON'T:  microwave it or blow dry it. Heating it up this quickly is not going to save it. The high heat can damage the precious electronics inside. Don't worry about powering it off, just leave it.
  • DO: take it out of the water immediately (duh, but you would be surprised how many people freak out and leave it in there longer.) Take a deep breath, take out the battery (if you can). Then get it in a sealed container if you want to try rice or those desiccant packets (you can save from shoe boxes, etc). There are also other products you can purchase, if you want to be prepared ahead of time. 


5. How do I check what my kids have backed up? Messages? Texts, you know, just to make sure we are all on the same page.

You should be checking in on your kids. I mean that. Maybe I sound old fashioned but if you are paying for their phone, their data, if you are providing them with a roof and safe place to live, then you need to come up with some type of agreement and checking system. It doesn't always have to be a trust issue, it's caring and being a parent.  Developmentally (even though they will argue they are mature enough), they are not psychologically mature to deal with all this social media stress. Communication and finding natural ways to talk to them is best.

This clearly could be it's own separate post, so I will just give you two pieces of advice for now:

a. Talk to your kids, FREQUENTLY, about what they are posting and why. Many kids have multiple social media accounts, for obvious reasons, one they show their parents, one they do not.  Here is a great article to follow up and read. It's up to you on how you want to set expectations and how much you want to monitor what they do. Be proactive, not reactive.

b. There are social network protection programs out there, here is one to check out: Avira Social Network Protection.

And finally, somewhat unrelated but here you go.
BONUS ROUND.  I just backed up into someone else. What should I do?

Unfortunately, I have been there and done that. Get a back up vehicle camera and there's an app for that! Much cheaper than the factory models. Check out an example here.



Saved by the bell! Don't throw in the technology towel, stay active and current with your important docs, pics and data. Give it your best shot.


Here are some funny clips of Muhammad Ali's boxing days (you can watch this when you get frustrated with your digital device).



Tuesday, September 9, 2014

24/7 Technology: The Pendulum Keeps Swinging


Back and forth: how do you find balance with technology?


I always tell my technology educational courses, I feel as though technology is represented by a pendulum. Technology trends high one way and then come back full swing the other way. I tend to think of iPads, mobile devices... the "next-best-whatever-technology-is-coming-our-way" trendy technology tools as such.  

If you remember your basic physics you know that when a pendulum swings there are two common types of energy: potential energy and kinetic energy


This is how I see them represented in today's techy times:

Potential Energy: The energy stored as a result of it's position. The higher the "bob" (pendulum ball that swings around) from it's equilibrium position the more energy it has. When Apple gets ready to launch a new product, hello iPhone 6 , it gains momentum as we are all waiting and waiting for it. It gets elevated higher and higher because of all the hype with the launch. 

Then they drop the bob, and there it goes...just another new device with another new charger that we all have to buy. One more new tool or update teachers and parents have to try figure out  over the next six months while students already have mastered it in a day. These shimmery new gadgets have the potential to blind you from what you really need.


Kinetic Energy: The energy in motion. Hands free revolution seems to be gaining some traction. It's in motion and come to think of it, it always has been.  What is "Hands Free Revolution"? It's basically getting back to the basics, where we were before all this technology as far as relationships and valuing physically being with those we are surrounded by.  We know that kinetic motion is dependent upon the square of it's speed. In relation to hands free revolution, the more speed we give it, the more force it will have.


Technology: along for the ride?


Pendulums also represent balance. Back and forth, keeping the equilibrium. So if we view technology as a tool and not a 24/7 addiction. we can keep our balance. Hands free revolution offers that balance.  It's a way we once lived our lives and a way we need to get back to with ourselves, our families. Setting boundaries with our digital devices and which ones we choose to purchase and operate.  We can easily find ways to use our techy tools to help us be more efficient and grow without our stunting our minds and relationships.

Le't set limits, model the behavior we seek to see. I was in a meeting last week with six other people. Two of the committee members were on their phones texting the entire time. Did I say anything. No. Did I ever get out my phone and text? No. Was I tempted to retaliate. Yes. But at the end of it all, I walked away thankful for the other four people who I was able to listen to and enjoy their company. The five of us actually got quite a bit accomplished!


Let go of the constant swinging and enjoy hands free moments!


Letting go of daily distractions and grasping onto what really matters. Get that momentum. Take your time and indulge in precious moments with those you adore. Find ways to detach from your devices. Don't judge those that may not follow along. Every person, each family has their own way of handling how they are going to move forward in this 21 century society. It's important for us to think about it, plan for it and communicate it. In a world where we feel like we need our devices to survive in our professional and personal lives, let's stop for a minute and see which way we are moving.

Sir Isaac Newton once said, "We build too many walls and not enough bridges."

Let's figure out ways to use our keep our digital devices from building walls and focus on building and restoring some bridges.



Thursday, September 4, 2014

Sloppy Joe's? Not These HS Kids...Tucked in Shirts, Neckties and Working Hard



Everybody is crazy about a sharp dressed man.


Just when I think I couldn't love and respect a school anymore, I show up to a Cristo Rey High School meeting this week and find their marketing card, "Neckties are required." 

When was the last time you wore a necktie or equivalent of (I realize not all ladies wear neckties like me)?

Saw a kid wear a necktie in high school school?
Noticed someone wear a necktie to work!?

Something that seems to be fading in our work environments today is looking professional. Now, I'm not saying every man or woman needs to be wearing a suit, but you have to admit, some people take "dress down day" to the extremes. I understand many jobs and careers require their employees to wear casual attire due to the type of work they do on a daily basis. I'll be honest though, I have been out in factories and through warehouses where I have seen workers dressed in better uniforms and more respectful work clothes then some people out in business offices. What happened to" more is...appropriate and less is...inappropriate? When expected to dress up for the occasion, dressing down seems to becoming an issue.


Not at Cristo Rey High School in KC!



Uniting in their uniforms:  At Cristo Rey High School, every student wears a uniform at school and at work. They are expected to look professional and take pride in themselves and their school. They literally work to be at school, not just keeping up with their academics, but also for their tuition. When I was in high school, we did not have uniforms, but we were not wearing anything racy either. The early 90's brought the "layering of clothes" style coupled with one of my parents inspecting my outfit before I ran out the door. Not every student is going to default to wearing appropriate clothing, which is why schools need to emphasize a dress code policy, but more importantly, have honest and respectful conversations with students about the why. Why shouldn't students wear super mini skirts to school or jeans hanging off their bottoms, could you explain that to a High School student in a way they would relate to? If not, we need to try and connect with this generation. Some of them feel it is perfectly fine to dress half naked at school. Cristo Rey has taken the initiative to keep high standards of dress attire.


Working for a better education: The students Cristo Rey work for their tuition. The way the work study program is this: Most students perform entry-level clerical work. They answer telephones, maintain files, sort and deliver mail, scan and fax documents, perform data entry, or create documents with Microsoft Office products. Corporate job sponsors commit to a fee-for-service contract stating that money earned by students goes directly towards the cost of education at Cristo Rey Kansas City. The Corporate Work Study Program (CWSP) is an essential component of a Cristo Rey Kansas City education. Students earn credit hours for work study and roughly half of the cost of their own education. Cristo Rey staff consider the skill-level required for the job and the particular interests and skills of the student. Then CWSP assigns students to a job site. All new students attend a four-week Summer Training Institute. The institute teaches students a range of workplace skills:  communication on the phone, face-to-face, and by note or memo; use of office machines; file and record maintenance; business ethics and etiquette; and, essential computer skills. Returning students participate in an intensive one-week refresher course at the beginning of the school year. What do the students wear to their job site? Their professional school uniform.


Community buy in: With over 120 companies and organizations in the KC metro area supporting the work study program, it is no wonder there is a 90% rate of retention of job placement. Companies are working with our future work force and leaders...NOW. Showing them the ropes, expecting hard and soft skills and mentoring them all along the way.

There are three responsibilities of the business partner:

1.  Provide a positive work environment for the student – give instructions and offer feedback.
2.  Assign a supervisor who believes in the program.
3.  Identify meaningful work for the student and appraise work regularly.

I have such incredible respect for companies that seek out ways to support creative programs which really do make a difference. It takes time and money, but we are seeing inspiring improvements and positive changes brought to these students' lives which will impact them for years to come. We sometimes complain about the millennials and their work ethic, well, here's your chance to do something about it. Teach them, show them, care about them...just like someone did for you.

Let me end by saying that there is nothing wrong with a casual attire work policy, "dress down day" or a wear-what-you-want type of business environment. Anyone can rock a pair of jeans and make themselves look presentable. But that's just it, it's up you, and anyone else out there to take pride in who you are, where you want to be and want you aspire to be. 
The students at Cristo Rey have it figured out. They are dressed for success.



Take 2 minutes to learn more about Cristo Rey Schools and their talents right here in KC:

If you would like more information about Cristo Rey or the work study program, please feel free to contact more or visit their website: http://www.cristoreykc.org/






Additional Sources:



Monday, September 1, 2014

Adios! Off to Nicaragua


 "Every time you smile at someone, it is an action of love, a gift to that person, 
a beautiful thing." ---Mother Teresa

This Saturday I will be receiving one of the greatest gifts. An opportunity to serve in Nicaragua. I am  leaving for a week long service-immersion trip through Rockhurst University to Chinandega, Nicaragua. Fifteen RU undergraduate students (selected from over 200 applicants), Ken Mellard,and I will be together on this adventure. I'm fortunate to work and serve at Rockhurst University, where there are several opportunities for service-immersion trips in domestic and international places. This is a trip I have been striving to be a part of for several years. I kept telling myself the time wasn't right, but now it has all come together. I can't stop smiling.

These week-long experiences, which include manual labor, cultural immersion activities, relationship-building, and daily prayer and reflection, move students and faculty to a deeper understanding of the Gospel’s call to solidarity and justice. Extensive trip preparation and follow-up lead students and faculty toward the life-long path of becoming women and men for and with others. 

We will be working with the organization, Amigos for Christ. Amigos for Christ is a nonprofit organization which has been serving the people of Nicaragua for 15 years. This charity hosts over 50 mission trips a year. They continue to hold a four star rating through Charity Navigator. Charity Navigator has been in existence for over 10 years and they evaluate charity organization on two broad areas: Financial Health and their Accountability and Transparency. Amigos for Christ support four different projects:  Water and Sanitation, Health Care, Education and Nutrition, and Economic Development.

A few startling facts related to these projects:

  • One half of Nicaraguan population survives on less than $2 a day.
  • 67% of children in Nicaragua will not finish 6th grade.
  • Skin disease, parasites and diarrhea are the leading causes of death in Nicaragua.
I'll be honest, I have a little bit of anxiety about the language barrier. Even though I took three years of Spanish in High School (thank you Senora Wempe!) and two years in college, I am not fluent, to say the least. But, one of my students who has gone on this mission trip prior said she felt the same way. She explained she just went for it and that made all the difference. Meaning, she just approached everyone she met with a smile and did the best she could to interact and communicate with them through playing and working. Once she started modeling actions speak louder than words, her week long journey in service was a very positive one. She said she felt alive with everyone she met. This reminded me of a quote I read on the Amigos for Christ website: 

"Don't ask yourself what the world needs. Ask yourself what makes you come alive and go do that. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive".  --Howard Thurman


I'm excited for the week ahead! I feel incredibly honored to be working alongside our RU students, the volunteers at Amigos for Christ, and most importantly, the Nicaraguan people. Please keep us in your prayers. I can't wait to share my experience with you when I return. 



True to the picture of those precious little girls from Nicaragua above, I hope to see, feel, share, and receive many smiles!




Here is a short video of some Nicaraguan children:




To learn more about Amigos for Christ and those they serve you can: 



Monday, August 25, 2014

Following Ferguson: What Do We Say To Kids?

Where is the love?

I remember graduating from college and wondering how in the world I was going to get a teaching job mid year. I had to extend my higher education stay (much to my parent's delight, not) after deciding to earn a dual major and certification in early childhood and elementary education. This left me with a December graduation. Being that teachers work on yearly contracts, I was pretty much out of luck. I started subbing in any district that would take me and quickly found an opportunity to be a teacher's aid in the Ferguson -Florissant School District. Not being from Saint Louis I wasn't very knowledgeable about the area but applied anyways. Within a week I was hired and started working at a small public elementary school in Ferguson.

Prior to landing the teacher's aide position in Ferguson, I had just completed a 3rd grade student teaching placement in Ladue School District. I thought it was heaven! I worked with the Missouri Teacher of the Year and had access to incredible resources, ongoing support and met amazing families throughout that prior semester.
  
I can tell you that the differences between Ladue and Ferguson Florissant were night and day. But that's not what I want to talk about, because that's all people are talking about. Differences, how different people are in Ferguson from other areas of St. Louis and beyond. I want to talk about the similarities. The students in Ferguson were just as adorable as the children I taught in Ladue. The teachers were just as hard working as the teachers in Ladue and I met Ferguson parents who were incredibly passionate about education as I did in the Ladue School District.  I enjoyed working there just as much as I did student teaching in Ladue. Why? Kids are kids and they want to feel loved and respected. They made me feel loved and respected, both the white and the black kids.

Your own kids, or kids you know may be feeling a little confused right now, as they may have heard about the devastating situation in Ferguson. Obviously, this tragedy hits home to me. As adults, it can be difficult to explain the recent turn of events, and incredibly challenging as we seek ways to explain all that is happening. Here are some ways to help kids understand what is going on:


1. Acknowledge what they have seen and heard.  Well, thanks to social media and instant connection to the world, it's impossible to monitor everything kids are watching.  Ask them what they know, what have they heard and seen.  Pop that bubble you think they reside in. Kids are all different. Some may want to talk about it at the dinner table, some may want to talk in private, some may not want to talk about it all. Our kids listen and absorb more than we give them credit for. Ferguson is not a secret nor should it be swept under the rug just because it is not directly affecting your family. It's real life and families are being torn apart. Families just like ours. Communities are at risk. You can start by discussing your own family values, how does your family feel about violence, how does your family feel about racism? Yep, the R word.

2. Racism is real and it starts at home. No one is born racist. Racism is a product and consequence of one's home environment. If I were to guess, I would say that everyone knows someone who is racist. Our kids need to know what it means to be racist and why racism exists.  I don't know what it is like to be black. A black person doesn't know what it's like to be white. We can make assumptions and waste our time trying to envision that, or we can utilize our time in talking with people from other races and seek understanding from their own words. Asking them about their own culture, their own families. We can learn to understand the differences but also see similarities. Yes, there are images, stories, and allegations about the racism portrayed in Ferguson that appears scary and irrational. Keep in mind there are many angles to this tragic event.

3. We don't know the facts. Speculations and the news media are not 100% correct. We need to explain this to our kids.  The supporters of Michael Brown want justice. Some of these supporters are peacefully protesting, while others are violently rioting. The supporters of Darren Wilson, the police officer who killed Michael Brown believe he was doing his job and acted accordingly with the law. While the investigation carries on, the majority of American surveyed (65%) said they do not have enough information to decide which side they are on. Until the case unfolds further, and correct valid information is shared, one can only base their opinion about what is being interpreted through the media.


4. Moving forward. Hopefully kids can find peace and understanding by doing the following: praying for the families, asking questions, but more importantly, realizing that in life sometimes peoples' actions do not make sense. Adults don't always have the answers but we can encourage questions. Avoid judgment and let kids know that some peoples' opinions can come across disrespectful or opinionated. Remain hopeful, while this is certainly a challenging and devastating issue, we have to show hope for the future. Talking with our kids about how we can change our actions, and our thoughts to support those who experience such hurt and violence. Not everything is black and white, even though that is the big issue in this case.

The police officers involved and the Ferguson rioters...all human. That's one thing we have in common, no matter what color we are, we are human. We have a body, a heart and a soul. All which need to be loved and respected. We can't get there if we don't talk about it.



Tuesday, August 19, 2014

This is 40? Oh Boy, Was I Wrong!


I've worn many hats over the years, but this is one I will always cherish.


I remember when my mom turned 40, I was 14. I seriously thought, "My poor mom, she is getting so old." And, you know what? I probably told her that too. Not in a sweet, compassionate way, but more of a snotty, junior high tone of voice way (can't wait until my girls hit that age...karma, karma, karma).

Boy was I wrong about 40.


Over the last few weeks as I have headed into my fourth decade of survival, I have realized it's not so bad. In fact, I'm actually enjoying this older version of myself.  Here are some things I have come to embrace over the years and will continue to work on in the coming years.



  • I have a bigger appreciation for parenting. Life can be unpredictable, challenging and completely overwhelming at times.It takes a village to raise our families. I don't believe you have to physically bear a child to be a parent. From teaching in my early 20s to raising kids of my own, then watching my close friends and families support me by taking my kids after school, giving them hugs and kisses when they see them and letting me know that parenting can be hard are all ways we parent together. I also have grown to appreciate my own parents more, now that I am older. Cliche' but it is true. I love our close relationship and even partnership when talking through difficult issues and enjoying each other's company as we laugh and joke around. Everyone has their own way of parenting, and I love that. I love that my kids will be raised by a variety of special people.





The most positive spirit in my life. I also need to thank her for not dyeing my bangs blond.

I love these times with my dad. I always learn something new and it's usually not about fishing.



  • It's the little things that really count. I have always struggled with the fact that people pop in and out of our lives. I have experienced deep heartache at times when someone leaves my life for whatever reason. As I have gotten older, I have grown to feel blessed by the fact that they were even present in my life at all. I now try to let go of the reason why they had to leave and focus on what I learned from them. Some lessons have been positive, others eye-opening and left with a sting, but overall it's the little experiences along the way that have the lasting effect. Another thing I have learned, is how much a small gesture can impact your whole day: a simple smile, a warm hug, and short thank you or even quick note.  Never underestimate how some things, which seem insignificant, have great power.
He quickly reminded me of how holding someone's hand, even briefly, can make all the difference.
  • You get one body. The wrinkles are coming, the scars have set in and I can't eat a Quarter Pounder anymore without feeling sick (that latter one probably has more to do with the awful food choice).  My body needs to be respected and I have started to embrace it's imperfections more and more.  My wrinkles have become reminders of the many laughs I have had over the years. My scars are symbols of a life lived and reminders to slow down.  I have to workout more frequently to remain healthy and watch closely what I consume. While it's not always exciting to workout and eat healthy food, it's been rewarding to know that if try my best,  I can avoid this body from breaking down!

Definitely my daughter, I use to choose suckers over blueberries, too.
  • Find an aspect about your job that you love. Everyone has a job to do, whether you take home a paycheck or stay at home with your family. There are areas of our jobs, careers, professional responsibilities which make us wonder, from time to time, if we are in the right place. I have learned that it is impossible to love every single thing about what you do. That's what makes work...well, work. Working hard does pay off, but not every time. There's this important piece about it all: follow through. Start something and finish it. Be reliable and always be gracious. Standing up for yourself can be difficult at times given the situation but it crucial to gain respect. There are times when I do not enjoy completing certain tasks. It's life, it's work! I do love the fact that I work at a Jesuit University which promotes growth: professionally and personally. This is such a work in progress...striking that balance of finishing up and knowing when to end my day.

I get to see and feel growth at work, for which I am thankful
  • Soothe your soul. Nurturing your soul to find that inner peace has become very important to me. Feeding my soul by laughing with others, listening to music or even just being alone are gifts. Prayer and meditation; more importantly, reflection are ways my soul feels refreshed. We all have different needs, wants and wishes. Don't neglect your soul.  Everyone has a soul, is a soul, be sure to find time to soothe your soul. 



I have much more to learn and experience! Here's to being wrong about 40 and looking forward to the next 40+ years of feeling right!


One of my favorite prayers:

Mighty God, Father of all, Compassionate God, Mother of all, 
Bless every person I have met, every face I have seen, every voice I have heard especially those most dear. 
Bless every city, town, and street I have known, bless every sight I have seen, every object I have touched. In some mysterious way these have all fashioned my life; all that I am, I have received. 
Great God, bless this world.
--Jack Morris, SJ


Funny scene from "This is 40"...

Monday, August 11, 2014

Back To School: Stop Complaining!

You can't play hooky on the first day of school.


Why do we make kids go to school? How awful, right? I mean, it's the law, so kids have to go. But, the more parents keep telling their child how sad they are that school is starting again, the more likely the child will....well...hate going to school. 

Is that what you want?

No?

So, stop it.

I keep seeing posts and hearing some parents talk about what a big bummer it is that their child has to go back to school so soon. While it is perfectly understandable to experience negative feelings about our summer's end, we need to stay positive about the fact that our kids get to go back to learning and growing as individuals.

I think sometimes our society takes for granted that we live in a country which provides education for our children. Here are some quick facts which I hope will have a positive light on why we should be happy our children get to go back to school

1. There are approximately 121 million children worldwide without access to education.
2. Data shows children in India and China go to school 25-30% longer than children in the US.
3. All brains do not develop at the same rate which is why it is important to expose children to a variety of activities, which schools offer.
4. Three main reasons children attend school are to: gain social skills, qualify for jobs and learn other viewpoints
5. Schools that encourage risk-taking help children make mistakes and learn from them, which gives their self-esteem gets a boost!

Remember, it's all in the way you phrase it.  A school is the facility where our children learn and grow. Promoting the love of learning is going to be more successful than the promotion of the institution.

Here are some ways you can encourage your kids to love learning:
  • Good mornin': The school day starts as soon as they get up and at 'em. Mornings can be so hectic. Make that car ride to school or quick pep talk before they head out the door count!
  • Team up: It's really a team effort. Building relationships with their teachers is beyond crucial. You may not see eye to eye with all their teachers, but the more positive you can keep that partnership the better off your child's school experience will be.
  • Open up: Sometimes it's difficult to get our kids to talk about their school day. Plus, every child communicates in different ways. The dinner table may work for some, but others may prefer to talk about their day over shooting baskets or reading a book together. You know your child better than anyone. Try to find a special moment frequently.
  • Extend it out: As we all know, the school day doesn't end at the last bell, so extend their day into something they enjoy doing or an activity they look forward to now and then. Between clubs, practices, appointments and other commitments, our kiddos get over-scheduled...quick! Let them choose, as often as they can, what they want to do to take a break from the structured school day they have had.
  • Good night!  EVERYONE needs a good night's sleep. Technology/electronics should be closed out an hour or two before bedtime.Encourage your kids to veg out, read or just relax at least an hour before lights out.


A new year of learning, a new year of growth...a new year of fun! 
It starts at home, as it should. 
So cheer your kids on, encourage them to love to learn and enjoy watching them do it!




Having a hard time motivating a child to go to school...just twist and shout!


Other Sources: http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=65
http://www.edplus.org/Legislative%20Advocacy/Resources/Unaccredited_Schools_Position_Paper.pdf
http://www.kmbc.com/news/mo-supreme-court-unaccredited-districts-must-pay-for-student-transfers/20515568#!bAYDsJ